Why You Need To Be Careful This Summer

Allloooo Mummies and Daddies!!

There are many ways to keep a child cool, but there is one thing we’re doing that is potentially life threatening. Here is what you need to know!

 Putting blankets and muslins over prams and car seats.

Now usually you may think this is harmless because you are doing what you feel is best for your child, but what you’re actually doing is trapping the heat inside of the pram with no circulation of fresh air and essentially turning it into a furnace. Something I had no idea you could do.

Young children are naturally more sensitive to heat because their little bodies can rise in tempature around about three-to-five times faster than an older child or adult. Due to this, younger children are at greater risk of developing heatstroke and other health risks such as Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).

Svante Norgren, a paediatrician at the Astrid Lindgren Children’s hospital in Stockholm, spoke to a Swedish newpaper, the Svenska Dagbladet.

Afterwards the newspaper decided to act on Dr. Norgren findings and found themselves that a pram left uncovered on a warm day reached 22C, but when a thin cover was put on, it reached 34C in 30 minutes and then 37C on the hour! So what do you need to do?


Your guide this summer:

  • Babies less than six months old should be kept out of direct sunlight.

  • Older infants should also be kept out of the sun as much as possible, particularly in the summer and between 11am and 3pm.

  • Use a parasol or SnoozeShade to shade the baby instead.
  • Apply a sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least 15 to your baby’s skin.
  • Make sure your child wears a sunhat with a wide brim or a long flap at the back, to protect their head and neck from the sun.
  • Avoid dehydration. Bottle fed babies may need boiled water, but breastfed babies don’t (breastmilk is high in water although may want to feed more). Source NHS.

Signs to look out for:

  •  Sleepiness
  • Dry skin, mouth and eyes
  • Irritability
  • Pale
  • Clammy skin

If your child develops any signs of heat exhaustion, contact your doctors or 111. If you’re worried or just anxious, always speak to a professional.


A HUGE eye opener for me!

Don’t forget share this, you may just help a fellow Mummy or Daddy this summer!


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